Last edited by Shaktijas
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Syringe-exchange programmes for injecting drug users. found in the catalog.

Syringe-exchange programmes for injecting drug users.

Gerry V. Stimson

Syringe-exchange programmes for injecting drug users.

by Gerry V. Stimson

  • 245 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Taken from Aids, vol. 3, 1989, pp. 253-260.

SeriesAids -- v.3
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20849562M

sterile syringes for injection drug users; attitudes of participants in a syringe exchange program. Journal of American Pharmacy Association. Jan-Feb;39(1); Kahn, J. Economic evaluation of primary HIV prevention in injection drug users.   The Consolidated Appropriations Act of permits use of funds from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), under certain circumstances, to support SSPs, with the exception that funds may not be used to purchase needles or syringes. HHS released guidance. [PDF – KB, 22 pages] for state, local, tribal, and territorial health.

To participate in syringe exchange, drug injectors must present a coded syringe exchange program identification card. These cards were also used to determine eligibility for TB screening. In addition, a brief screening tool was developed. Participants were asked about injecting drug use in the past 30 days, and about time using the by: 7. Injection drug users account for 16% of all new HIV infections in the US.7 Injection drug users account for almost half of the million Americans living with hepatitis C infection.8 Each year, 8, people are infected with HIV through sharing syringes.9 African Americans account for more than 50% of AIDS cases attributed toFile Size: KB.

syringe exchange program (SEP) dispensation policy and SEP client-level syringe coverage among injection drug users. Addiction, (4) 5. Cleland CM1, Deren S, Fuller CM. (). Syringe disposal among injection drug users in Harlem and the Bronx during the New York State Expanded Syringe Access Demonstration Program. Health Educ Behav,File Size: KB. A needle and syringe programme (NSP), syringe-exchange programme (SEP), or needle exchange program (NEP) is a social service that allows injecting drug users (IDUs) to obtain hypodermic needles and associated paraphernalia at little or no cost.


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Syringe-exchange programmes for injecting drug users by Gerry V. Stimson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Syringe exchange attracts injecting drug users to risk reduction, increases referral to treatment, and results in less HIV transmission. • Needle and syringe exchange programs signifi cantly decrease the number of discarded syringes in a community.

• Needle and syringe exchange programs have never been shown to increase drug. A CDC report shows a rise in the number of injection drug users accessing needle exchange programs. Officials want an even bigger increase. InPreventionWorks!, a needle exchange program in Author: Shawn Radcliffe.

Syringe Services Programs FAQs. Yes. When people who inject drugs use an SSP, they are more likely to enter treatment for substance use disorder and stop injecting than those who don’t use an SSP.

1,2,3,4 New users of SSPs are five times as likely to enter drug treatment as those who don’t use the programs. People who inject drugs and who have. To demonstrate that a syringe exchange program can reduce syringe re-use, to encourage HCV screening by injection drug users (IDUs), and to provide a.

Syringe-exchange programs (SEPs) have proven to prevent the spread of bloodborne pathogens, primarily human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), among injection drug users (IDUs). In the United States, only about 7% of IDUs have access to and use by: Injection drug use is associated with a high risk of infection by blood-borne diseases such as HIV and hepatitis C, but sterile syringe access programs, sometimes referred to as syringe exchange programs, help lower these risks by limiting syringe sharing and providing safe disposal options.

These programs also provide people who inject drugs with referrals to drug. Needle-exchange programmes (NEPs) are potentially a key strategy for containing the spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users, but their implementation has been limited by uncertainty about their by: Syringe exchange, as part of a comprehensive prevention program, minimizes the risks injection drug users will contract HIV or hepatitis C (HCV) infection or spread them to.

Needle and syringe programmes (NSPs) are a type of harm reduction initiative that provides clean needles and syringes to people who inject drugs (sometimes referred to as PWID) to reduce transmission of HIV and other blood borne viruses (such as hepatitis B and C).The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends providing sterile needles and syringes per drug.

Needle exchange programs are controversial harm reduction programs that provide sterile needles to people who inject drugs. Many programs also dispose of unsterile needles and provide an array of other services.

The goal of the programs is to reduce the transmission of diseases, such as HIV and hepatitis C. People who continue injecting drugs should never share needles, syringes, or other injection equipment such as cookers.

Many communities have syringe services programs (SSPs) where people can get free sterile needles and syringes and safely dispose of used ones. SSPs can also refer people to treatment for substance use disorder and help them get tested. To appraise the evidence critically for effectiveness of pharmacy‐based needle/syringe exchange programmes (pharmacy‐based NSPs) on risk behaviours (RBs), HIV/HCV prevalence and economic outcomes among people who inject drugs (PWID).

Design. Systematic review and meta‐analysis. Setting. Primary care setting. ParticipantsCited by: Through June a cumulative total of cases of AIDS have been reported in the Netherlands (circa 15 million inhabitants). Homosexual men are the most important risk group (78%), followed by injecting drug users (9%); 93% of the cumulative AIDS cases are men.

In new cases were diagnosed and in Most of the AIDS cases in the. This video was developed by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) South Asia as part of a 'Standard Operating Procedure on the Needle Syringe Exchange Program for Injecting Drug Users' - to.

The CDC shows participants in syringe exchange programs are more likely to enter drug treatment programs and more likely to stop injecting drugs, but the programs don't increase drug consumption.

Orange County, Calif. is suing the state to block needle exchange programs in four of its cities. The opioid crisis is fueling a dramatic increase in infectious diseases associated with injection drug use.; Reports of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) cases rose fold from to 1; The majority of new HCV infections are due to injection drug use.; Over 2, new HIV infections occur each year among people who inject drugs (PWID).

2; Syringe Services Programs. Inafter a large pharmacy in central Amsterdam stopped selling injection equipment to IDUs, the local health department and an Amsterdam drug users group (Junkiebond) set up a syringe exchange by: HIV incidence among injecting drug users in New York City syringe-exchange programmes.

Lancet. Oct 12; ()– van Ameijden EJ, van den Hoek JA, van Haastrecht HJ, Coutinho RA. The harm reduction approach and risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconversion in injecting drug users, Amsterdam.

Am J by: We evaluated an all-volunteer syringe exchange program in San Francisco, CA known as ''Prevention Point." Estimates of the number of injection drug users in San Francisco, range f to 16, in a city of approximatelyThe daily census in drug abuse treatment programs in San Francisco is approximately 1, individuals.

Synopsis: The current work provides a summary of the literature on syringe exchange programs (SEPs) and discusses roles for pharmacists in providing support for injection drug users (IDUs) and SEPs.

IDUs have an increased risk of contracting blood-borne diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus through the sharing and reuse Cited by:.

Due to the COVID Pandemic, many of the IDUHA programs have changed their program hours and locations. Use this link for the most up to date schedule for NYC Syringe Access Services. CAUTION: this information may not be accurate as things are ever evolving.

Contact the program to confirm. Persons who inject drugs (PWID) are at an elevated risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In many high-income countries, needle and syringe exchange programs (NSP) have been associated with reductions in blood-borne infections.

However, we do not have a good understanding of the effectiveness Cited by: Syringe Exchange Programs (SEP’s) are a popular policy prescription to manage the opioid crisis. Cities and towns, faced with the spread of blood-borne diseases like HIV from addicts sharing.